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Linux 5.16

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Not a lot here since -rc8, which is not unexpected. We had that extra
week due to the holidays, and it's not like we had lots of last-minute
things that needed to be sorted out.

So this mainly contains some driver fixes (mainly networking and
rdma), a cgroup credential use fix, a few core networking fixes, a
couple of last-minute reverts, and some other random noise. The
appended shortlog is so small that you might as well scroll through
it.

This obviously means that the merge window for 5.17 opens tomorrow,
and I'm happy to say I already have several pending early pull
requests.  I wish I had even more, because this merge window is going
to be somewhat painful due to unfortunate travel for family reasons.
So I'll be doing most of it on the road on a laptop - something I
generally try to avoid.

That said, the merging part of the merge window works perfectly well
on a laptop, it's just that I normally really want to do more local
build testing between merges than a laptop really allows me to do. So
the main downside during travel is that I end up relying much more on
the automated build testing in the cloud. And so really hope that
everything has been properly cooking in linux-next so that there are
no unnecessary issues that pop up when things hit my tree.

Of course, realistically our automated build testing is so good
anyway, and people have been pretty good about linux-next, that maybe
my local builds aren't _that_ important. I do end up occasionally
hitting issues that should never have made it as far as my tree, but
it's not like it's a common - or generally serious - issue.

Knock wood.

Anyway, I don't expect any real issue, but I'll probably be jetlagged
and in odd timezones, so my response time might be "variable".

But hey, before that merge window even opens, you still have some time
to give a shiny new kernel release some TLC and testing.

                Linus

Read more

Linux 5.16 Released With Many Intel & AMD Additions

  • Linux 5.16 Released With Many Intel & AMD Additions, Memory Folios, AMX, FUTEX2

    As expected the Linux 5.16 kernel has been promoted to stable.

    Linux 5.16 has many new features including the FUTEX2 futex_waitv system call for helping Steam Play (and Wine), memory folios have been mainlined, AMD Ryzen 6000 mobile series support is getting into better shape, Intel Alder Lake S graphics are now considered stable, Intel AMX support for Sapphire Rapids has landed, big AMD Ryzen with Radeon graphics performance improvements, and a wealth of other hardware improvements.

The 5.16 kernel has been released

  • The 5.16 kernel has been released

    Linus Torvalds has released the 5.16 kernel, as expected. Significant changes in 5.16 include the futex_waitv() system call, cluster-aware CPU scheduling, some internal memcpy() hardening, memory folios, the DAMON operating schemes user-space memory-management mechanism, and much more. See the LWN merge-window summaries (part 1, part 2) and the KernelNewbies 5.16 page for details.

Linux Kernel 5.16 Released! What’s New?

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Released! What’s New?

    Linux Kernel 5.16 is finally here, and while it doesn’t bring lots of features or improvements, there are a handful of features that might matter to Linux gamers and desktop users. Here’s everything new in the Linux Kernel 5.16.

    One of the release highlights is the improvements in the performance of Intel and AMD CPUs and GPUs. Apart from that, ARM platforms like the Raspberry Pi have also been improved. The AMD, Intel CPU, and GPU claims were tested by our good friends at Phoronix, and the results showed great improvements.

By Jean-Luc Aufranc (CNXSoft)

  • Linux 5.16 Release – Main Changes, Arm, RISC-V and MIPS architectures

    Not a lot here since -rc8, which is not unexpected. We had that extra week due to the holidays, and it’s not like we had lots of last-minute things that needed to be sorted out.

    So this mainly contains some driver fixes (mainly networking and rdma), a cgroup credential use fix, a few core networking fixes, a couple of last-minute reverts, and some other random noise. The appended shortlog is so small that you might as well scroll through it.

    This obviously means that the merge window for 5.17 opens tomorrow, and I’m happy to say I already have several pending early pull requests. I wish I had even more, because this merge window is going to be somewhat painful due to unfortunate travel for family reasons. So I’ll be doing most of it on the road on a laptop – something I generally try to avoid.

Linux Kernel 5.16 Release Improves Gaming

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Delivers Gaming Boost, Nintendo Joy-Con Drivers + More - OMG! Ubuntu!

    The Linux Kernel just received its major update of the year — and if you’re a gamer, it’s a corker!

    Linus Torvalds announced the availability of Linux kernel 5.16 exactly where he always announces it: the Linux kernel mailing list.

    The Linux 5.16 release was delayed by week or so due to the appearance of a red-suited bearded fellow, something Torvalds notes in his announcement where he quips: “we had that extra week due to the holidays, and it’s not like we had lots of last-minute things that needed to be sorted out”.

    So what’s new?

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Release Improves Gaming & Adds Support for New-Gen Hardware - It's FOSS News

    Linux Kernel 5.16 is an interesting release for both gamers and desktop users.

    The changes introduced aren’t massive, but useful upgrades for users with the latest hardware and looking to get better performance in terms of gaming.

    Linux Kernel 5.16: What’s New?

    The support for the latest generation hardware from team red (AMD) and team blue (Intel) are some major additions to this release. You will notice improvements for the CPU and GPU as well.

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Released, Speeds up Wine Games

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux kernel 5.16. The release offers plenty of new hardware support and features to get excited about.

    As expected Linus Torvalds announced Linux kernel 5.16 to stable in providing the latest features, hardware support, and other improvements ahead of the new 2022 Linux distribution releases, so let’s see what’s new.

    Playing video games on Linux can sometimes be a difficult process. Of course, gaming platforms such as Steam, allow users to play Windows games on Linux with the help of the projects like Proton. However, there is another option – Wine. With that said, the latest version of the Linux kernel brings a new system call, futex_waitv(), which results in better gaming performance while playing both native Linux games or Windows games on Wine.

    Looking at the CPUs, the biggest addition is that Intel’s Advanced Matrix Extensions support is now finally stable. This new extension introduces a unique and performant approach to matrix operations that are frequently used to demonstrate the high-performance capabilities of GPUs.

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 is out now bringing the futex2 work to help Linux Gaming | GamingOnLinux

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux Kernel 5.16, bringing with it the usual assortment of new hardware support and improvements everywhere. Plus, there's something big for Linux gaming fans.

    The one many have no doubt been waiting for is the inclusion of Collabora's work on FUTEX2 with futex_waitv(). This is supposed to help Linux gaming with Proton / Wine and also Native Linux gaming too. As Collabora developer André Almeida previously described it: "The use case of this syscall is to allow low level locking libraries to wait for multiple locks at the same time. This is specially useful for emulating Windows' WaitForMultipleObjects. A futex_waitv()-based solution has been used for some time at Proton's Wine (a compatibility layer to run Windows games on Linux). Compared to a solution that uses eventfd(), futex was able to reduce CPU utilization for games, and even increase frames per second for some games. This happens because eventfd doesn't scale very well for a huge number of read, write and poll calls compared to futex. Native game engines will benefit of this as well, given that this wait pattern is common for games.".

Linux kernel 5.16 now available with Nintendo...

  • Linux kernel 5.16 now available with Nintendo Switch controller drivers

    The Linux kernel is at the heart of countless devices and operating systems, including Android phones and tablets, Chromebooks, desktop Linux distributions, and much more. New versions are usually released every few months, and now version 5.16 is available to try out.

    Linus Torvalds, the creator and lead maintainer of the Linux kernel, wrote on the kernel mailing list (via omg! ubuntu!), “Not a lot here since [v5.16 release candidate 8], which is not unexpected. We had that extra week due to the holidays, and it’s not like we had lots of last-minute things that needed to be sorted out. So this mainly contains some driver fixes (mainly networking and rdma), a cgroup credential use fix, a few core networking fixes, a couple of last-minute reverts, and some other random noise.”

    Perhaps the most important change in this release is a new kernel system called ‘futex2,’ short for ‘fast user mutex.’ It allows applications to create mutexes, semaphores, conditional variables, and other fast-performing synchronization mechanisms. This new feature could improve performance of games running in the Wine compatibility layer (as well as native Linux games), but Wine hasn’t implemented this yet, so we’ll have to wait and see how that turns out.

Linux Kernel 5.16 Released

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Released

    Linux Kernel 5.16 is now available for download. Linus Torvalds announced the availability of Linux kernel 5.16. You can download Linux kernel 5.16 right now from the kernel.org website. The Linux 5.16 release was delayed by a week

Linux 5.16 released: Bootlin contributions

  • Linux 5.16 released: Bootlin contributions

    Linux 5.16 has been released on January 9. As usual, our recommended reading to learn more about this release is the corresponding Kernelnewbies.org page and the two articles from LWN covering the 5.16 merge window: part 1 and part 2.

André Almeida (Collabora) on Linux Kernel 5.16

  • Kernel 5.16: A new release for a new year

    What's more refreshing than a new kernel release to start a new year? 2021 was a year with all sorts of challenges, from fighting the pandemic to deep diving complex technical problems. In case you missed it, have a look at our Year in Review for a summary of the accomplishments made by our kernel team over the last year.

    With kernel 5.16 made available earlier this month, the community has once again produced a release full of great features, like improving memory management performance via folio's API and better scheduler awareness of CPU topologies that share L2/L3 caches. You can read more about these, and other highlights, over at LWN (part1, part2) and at Kernel Newbies.

    More importantly, this latest release sees the culmination of two projects that had been in development for some time by our kernel team. Collaborans contributed both the new futex syscall and the new fanotify event, two new APIs which took long hours of research and cooperation with the kernel development community to come to fruition. It's great to see the hard work of our kernel experts paying off!

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