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Microsoft Windows and Apple as Liabilities

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  • Energy secretary backs ban on ransomware payments: 'You are encouraging the bad actors'

    Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm said Sunday that she supports a law that would ban companies from paying ransom to [crackers] holding their information hostage after a recent spate of cyberattacks on companies responsible for crucial parts of the U.S. infrastructure.

    In an interview on NBC's "Meet the Press," Granholm acknowledged that she is not sure whether Congress or President Joe Biden are ready to take that step, but she warned that paying ransom only emboldens [crackers]. And she said private companies need to take responsibility and tell the government when they are attacked for the good of the country.

  • US recovers millions in cryptocurrency paid to Colonial Pipeline [crackers] [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Colonial Pipeline, a network that provides around 45 percent of the East Coast’s fuel, was the target of a crippling cyberattack last month that forced it to shut down operations for several days.

    Joseph Blount, the company’s CEO, later revealed in an interview with The Wall Street Journal that he authorized the company to pay the cyber criminals behind the attack the equivalent of $4.4 million in bitcoin on the day of the breach in exchange for the keys to decrypt the network.

    The FBI recommends against paying the ransom, as it may encourage the [attackers] to go after another group, and the payment may be used for criminal operations. The Biden administration has reiterated this stance in recent weeks.

  • US Snatches Back Ransom from Colonial Pipeline [Crackers] [iophk: Windows TCO]

    U.S. law enforcement officials say they have hit back at the Russian-based criminal network that caused gas pipelines to shut down across parts of the country last month, seizing much of the multimillion-dollar ransom payment before it could be used.

    The Justice Department announced Monday it recovered $2.3 million of the approximately $5 million Colonial Pipeline paid to the DarkSide Network following the ransomware attack, which resulted in fuel shortages along the U.S. East Coast.

  • Feds recover millions from pipeline ransom [crackers], hint at U.S. [Internet] tactic [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The FBI was able to seize control of DarkSide's proceeds by gaining access to a central account holding about 63.7 bitcoins, worth around $2.3 million, Deputy Director Paul Abbate said. A court document said that the seizure took place in Northern California, putting it within reach of U.S. law, and that the FBI was able to access the "private key," or password, for one of the gang's bitcoin wallets. It was unclear how the key was compromised.

  • Adversaries Could Shut Down US Power Grid, Energy Secretary Says [iophk: Windows TCO]

    When Granholm was asked by CNN’s Jake Tapper about vulnerabilities in the electricity grid and whether a foreign actor has the ability to shut it down, Granholm said, “Yeah, they do. There are thousands of attacks on all aspects of the energy sector and the private sector generally.”

  • Senate sergeant at arms says cyberattack more worrisome than repeat of Jan. 6 insurrection [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Senate Sergeant at Arms Karen Gibson said Saturday she is more concerned about a cyberattack on the government than another insurrection like the one that rocked Capitol Hill on Jan. 6.

  • First Known Malware Surfaces Targeting Windows Containers

    Organizations running Windows containers in their Kubernetes cluster have a brand-new threat to worry about.

    Researchers from Palo Alto Networks (PAN) have discovered what they say is the first known malware targeting Windows containers. The malware, named Siloscape, is designed to escape from a Windows container into the Kubernetes node so it can spread in the cluster.

    Attackers can use the malware to carry out a variety of malicious actions, such as credential and data theft, deploying ransomware, and breaching enterprise software development and testing environments.

    Daniel Prizmant, senior staff researcher at PAN's Unit 42 threat intelligence team, says the malware is a manifestation of the growing attacker focus on cloud environments. "Attackers are undergoing their own digital transformation and exploiting the massive enterprise shift to the cloud and new technologies like containers," he says. "As a result, container security has become important."

  • Apple pays millions to woman after explicit photos posted online

    Apple paid millions of dollars to a student after iPhone repair technicians posted explicit photos and videos from her phone to Facebook, legal documents have revealed.

    The tech giant agreed a settlement with the 21-year-old after two employees at a repair facility uploaded the images from a phone she had sent to Apple to be fixed, resulting in “severe emotional distress”.

    The incident, which occurred in 2016 at a centre in California run by Pegatron, an Apple contractor, is one of the most significant privacy violations to be revealed at an iPhone repair facility.

  • Student's nude photos leaked to Facebook by iPhone service centre, Apple now paying her millions of dollars

    The confidentiality agreement was meant to avoid “substantial business harm”, as Apple insisted on confidentiality throughout the settlement. For this reason, Apple was simply referred to as a “customer” throughout the proceedings.

    The tech major was only recently named as the customer during a separate, unrelated lawsuit it faced. Apple confirmed the incident to The Telegraph.

    The confidentiality agreement left many details of the incident hidden. What is known is that the two employees have been fired after an “exhaustive” investigation by Apple. Apple has also been reimbursed for the settlement by Pegatron. Pegatron and its insurers, who refused to pay the bill, have now settled the matter privately.

    The incident shows a glaring loophole in the tall claims repeatedly made by Apple over the strict control of its repair facilities. The company has often cited this as an argument against legislation that would make it easier for third parties to fix its devices. It seems like Apple’s case does not seem too strong if such incidents can occur within the company’s well-monitored facilities.

  • Apple settles with student after authorized repair workers leaked her naked pics to her Facebook page

Windows TCO:"$2.3M Paid by Colonial Pipeline to Ransomware Gang"

  • Justice Dept. Claws Back $2.3M Paid by Colonial Pipeline to Ransomware Gang

    The U.S. Department of Justice said today it has recovered $2.3 million worth of Bitcoin that Colonial Pipeline paid to ransomware extortionists last month. The funds had been sent to DarkSide, a ransomware-as-a-service syndicate that disbanded after a May 14 farewell message to affiliates saying its Internet servers and cryptocurrency stash were seized by unknown law enforcement entities.

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