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Oracle and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Ubuntu supports Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ampere A1 Compute

    Together with Oracle, Canonical announces an optimised Ubuntu image for the launch of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Ampere A1 Compute. Oracle Cloud customers will benefit from running Ubuntu, the most popular cloud operating system, on a secure, scalable, and highly cost-effective infrastructure.

    “Ubuntu on the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ampere A1 Compute provides a high performing and cost-effective solution for all types of workloads. Ubuntu gives developers a highly optimized cloud operating system and kernel with excellent boot speed, strong security, and stellar stability,” said Matt Leonard, vice president, product management, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

    “Ampere and Canonical are partnering to bring cloud native solutions to the market. Together, we have optimized everything from the Ubuntu OS to OpenStack to K8s to Anbox Cloud for Ampere® Altra®. We are excited to see all of these technologies available to the market on the OCI Ampere A1 platform, which is available on the OCI Free Tier today,” said Jeff Wittich, Chief Product Officer at Ampere Computing.

  • Oracle Ampere A1 Compute tuning for advanced users

    With CPU-bound benchmarks and applications such as SPEC CPU 2017, it's relatively straightforward to get optimal performance on an Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ampere A1 Compute instance. But, for applications that have many interrupts or that share memory across non-uniform memory access (NUMA) nodes, it takes some effort to get the best performance. On NUMA systems, a key aspect to control is remote memory accesses. Ensuring that work is done where an application's memory is located reduces expensive remote memory accesses and results in the best and most predictable performance on large-scale applications.

  • Start developing Arm-based applications quickly using the Oracle Linux Cloud Developer image

    We are excited for the availability of our Arm compute service on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI), built to deliver a high performance cloud offering based on the Ampere Altra processor. With the launch of the Ampere A1 Compute platform in OCI, we are also pleased to announce the availability of the Oracle Linux Cloud Developer image as part of OCI's Arm developer ecosystem.

    The launch of the Oracle Linux Cloud Developer image for Arm in OCI provides a fast and easy path to transition, build, and run Arm-based applications with the best price-performance in the cloud. This image bundles the most valuable and useful development tools, includes free licensing and support for many of these tools, and enables an immediate launch of a complete Arm development environment in the cloud.

  • Different Approaches to Open Source Knowledge Sharing

    Deb Bryant looks at how different open source communities develop, maintain, and distribute best practices.
    Paragraphs
    Creating open source software is a massive knowledge-sharing experience, says Deb Bryant, Senior Director of Red Hat's Open Source Program Office (OSPO) in a recent article at Opensource.com.

    Over time, she says, open source communities have “honed their knowledge into best practices as a natural byproduct of the open collaboration and transparency passed on within their respective communities.”

  • Migrating to SAP S/4HANA: Migration deadlines and how Red Hat technologies can help [Ed: IBM Red Hat as a proprietary software reseller]

    Digitalizing key business processes can be mission critical. But for many businesses, the pandemic slowed progress on key digital transformation initiatives. If your business depends on traditional SAP environments, delays are particularly problematic given the 2027 deadline for migration to SAP HANA or SAP S/4HANA.

    Red Hat can help by providing a portfolio of solutions that reduce the complexity of migration, make your data center more efficient, simplify hybrid IT, power the intelligent edge, and allow you to generate new business value.

  • IBM WebSphere App Server Now Available on Azure Linux VMs [Ed: IBM boosting Microsoft monopoly, not just in GitHub but also outside it. IBM is a truly misguided company that attacks the founder of GNU/Linux while propping up his enemies.]
  • How IBM is building together across the tech ecosystem to enable developers [Ed: IBM boosting Microsoft, as it did in the 1980s]

    As we heard at Think 2021, the era of hybrid cloud is increasing demands on enterprise developers with more responsibility shifting to you and your work as the critical success factors. An IBM Institute for Business Value study, The hybrid cloud platform advantage found that a typical enterprise uses nearly 8 clouds from multiple vendors, and in the next 3 years, hybrid cloud adoption is expected to grow by 47%. The average organization will be using nearly 6 clouds. As a result, businesses can benefit the most when they are supported by an ecosystem of partners that continually provides their best technologies and industry expertise.

    At this inflection point for enterprise developers, you’re being asked to deliver the kinds of solutions that require you to consistently invest in your skillsets and to build together collaboratively in an ecosystem environment. To help ease this transformation, my team’s goal is to help you build together: increasing capabilities for developers and lifting burdens that have previously hindered your innovation.

    A few months ago, we talked about an ongoing collaboration between IBM and Microsoft to enable the WebSphere product portfolio on Azure. Today, we are pleased to announce the availability of a new solution to run the IBM WebSphere Application Server (Traditional) Network Deployment on Azure Linux Virtual Machines. The solution is jointly developed and supported by IBM and Microsoft, and a wonderful example of how we are building together across the ecosystem to give you more flexibility to accomplish your goals.

Ubuntu Supports Oracle Cloud Infrastructure...

  • Ubuntu Supports Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ampere A1 Compute

    Together with Oracle, Canonical announces an optimised Ubuntu image for the launch of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Ampere A1 Compute. Oracle Cloud customers will benefit from running Ubuntu, the most popular cloud operating system, on a secure, scalable, and highly cost-effective infrastructure.

    “Ubuntu on the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ampere A1 Compute provides a high performing and cost-effective solution for all types of workloads. Ubuntu gives developers a highly optimized cloud operating system and kernel with excellent boot speed, strong security, and stellar stability,” said Matt Leonard, vice president, product management, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

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