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Games: VR, RetroPie and Godot

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Gaming
  • Who Knew Mac Could Even Do VR?

    Today’s news struck me as surprising. Apparently Valve is dropping SteamVR support for Mac. I had no idea this was even a thing! I mean, to be completely honest, even VR support on Linux is far from optimal – I usually say that if you are really into VR, the only OS you can consider is Windows and pretty much nothing else – at least for now.

    [...]

    It’s kind of amazing that Mac still has 2-3 times the size of Linux gaming despite being so obviously bad for development and support. I could be wrong, but it’s probably a developer fetish: a lot of artists and programmers work on Macs, and want to see their games working on the same machines too, regardless if it’s even a good use of their time or not.

    Anyway, let’s hope Valve put some real, sweating effort into SteamVR for Linux, because if VR ever takes off one day past a few inches of market share, we’d probably want to have it on our sweet OS as well.

  • Play video game ROMs on Raspberry Pi 4 with Debian Linux-based RetroPie 4.6

    Video games may be more popular than ever these days, but the truth is, they simply aren’t as fun as they used to be. Sadly, game developers focus too heavily on graphics and in-game purchases than actual gameplay. And so, in 2020, a true gamer is better served by playing video game ROMs from yesteryear, from systems like NES, SNES, Genesis, and N64.

    Thankfully, there’s no shortage of ways to play classic video game ROMs nowadays. You can even use inexpensive hardware like the Raspberry Pi line of computers to easily get them onto your TV screen. If you have the latest such device, the Raspberry Pi 4, I have some great news — you can finally use the Linux-based RetroPie for your classic gaming fun.

  • The Godot Game Engine's Vulkan Support Is Getting In Increasingly Great Shape

    Over the past three months many improvements were made to the Godot 4.0 engine code-base where this Vulkan renderer support will debut. With the latest code there is new screen-space reflection code, new subsurface scattering capabilities, reworked shadow bias settings, support for soft shadows in all light types, accurate frame render time reporting, MSAA anti-aliasing support has been restored, FXAA is also supported, and other renderer improvements.

  • Vulkan Progress Report #7

    It's been three months since a Vulkan progress report! I know you guys missed them, so I made sure to work extra hard to have something nice to make up. It feels great to be back to doing graphics programming after two months refactoring the core engine.

    So, here are the things that were worked on during April!

Godot Engine has more impressive progress towards Vulkan API...

  • Godot Engine has more impressive progress towards Vulkan API support

    Godot Engine is free, open source, cross-platform in both editor and exports and the next major update will bring in Vulkan API support and progress sounds great.

    It's been a couple months since the last full report from Godot lead developer, Juan Linietsky, who was previously working on a code refactoring process. Now that's done, they've been back to work on the graphics stack. Not just that though, other parts are being tweaked like node naming to be more consistent and clear between 2D and 3D.

    On the rendering side this includes improvements to screen-space reflectionso that's not as limited as the one in Godot 3.x. Linietsky mentioned that the new version will use a special screen-space filter to properly simulate roughness.

More on SteamVR

Valve Drops SteamVR for macOS, as Linux and Windows Now the Key

  • Valve Drops SteamVR for macOS, as Linux and Windows Now the Key Focus

    Valve has surprisingly decided to abandon SteamVR for macOS, with the company to only focus on Linux and Windows going forward.

    While it’s not known why the company has decided to drop the support for the macOS version of SteamVR, Valve says that developers continue building apps for Apple’s operating system, only that no new feature or bug fixes will be released in the future.

    Needless to say, this isn’t necessarily good news for macOS developers who invested in SteamVR, but Valve says from this point, it’ll only focus on the development of the platform on Windows and Linux.

StreamVR drops Mac support “so our team can focus

  • StreamVR drops Mac support “so our team can focus on Windows and Linux”

    Valve’s VR platform is dropping support for MacOS. The developers behind SteamVR announced at the end of April that they’re ending Mac support for SteamVR, and players on the platform will have to make do with legacy builds if they want to make use of the virtual reality hub – not that it’s going to matter much with the small volume of VR games on the platform, anyway.

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today's howtos

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