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Open Hardware/Modding Leftovers

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  • SiFive adds mid-range Essential 6-Series RISC-V cores, including two Linux-ready models

    SiFive announced a “21G3” release of its RISC-V cores, including a new, embedded focused “Essential 6-Series” featuring the Linux-ready, 64-bit U64 and a similar U64-MC designed for quad-core SoCs.

    Leading RISC-V core and SoC vendor SiFive, which last week unveiled a Cortex-A77 like SiFive Performance P650 core for up to 16-core SoCs, has released a 21G3 update to its entire product line. SiFive also announced a new mid-range line of 64-bit and 32-bit Essential 6-Series core IP, including Linux-friendly, 64-bit U64 and U64-MC models.

  • Two 64-bit RISC-V cores debut: StarFive Dubhe and CAS Nanhu

    StarFive has launched its 64-bit RISC-V “Dubhe” core with up to 2GHz @ 12nm performance plus Vector and Hypervisor extensions. Meanwhile, the Chinese Academy of Sciences announced a similarly Linux-friendly, 14nm RISC-V RV64GC “XiangShan Nanhu” core that also clocks to 2GHz.

    Chinese RISC-V chipmaker StarFive, which recently showed off a VisionFive V1 SBC with a StarFive JH7100 SoC with dual Cortex-A55 like SiFive U74 cores, has announced the “delivery” of its own RISC-V core called Dubhe. In other China-related RISC-V news, the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed a line of open source XiangShan RISC-V cores that run Linux, including a new, high performance XiangShan Nanhu design (see farther below).

  • An Easy Music Visualizer With The Arduino Nano | Hackaday

    Flashing LEDs are all well and good, but they’re even better if they can sync up with ambient sounds or music. [mircemk] has built the LUMAZOID visualizer to do just that, relying on some staple maker components to do so.

    The build is open-source, and designed to work with strings of 60, 120, or 180 WS2812B LEDs. An Arduino Nano is charged with running the show, capturing audio via its analog-to-digital converter. A sensitivity pot enables the input level to be set appropriately.

  • 3D Printed Lithographic Moon Lamp | Hackaday

    After years of being a software developer, [Chris] was excited to get back into embedded development and we’re glad he did. His 3D printed lithographic moon lamp combines a number of hacker and maker skills, and is sure to impress.

    3D-printed lithographic moons have gotten pretty popular these days, so he was able to find a suitable model on Thingiverse to start with. Gotta love open-source. Of course, he needed to make a few modifications to fit his end design. Namely, he put a hole at the bottom of the moon, so he could slide the LED and heatsink inside. The 3 watt LED is pretty beefy, so he definitely needed a heat sink to make sure everything stayed cool.

  • Simple Design Elevates This Mechanical Dot Matrix Display | Hackaday

    Don’t get us wrong — we love unique displays as much as anyone. But sometimes we stumble across one that’s so unique that we lack the basic vocabulary to describe it. Such is the case with this marble-raising dot-matrix alphanumeric display. But it’s pretty cool, so we’ll give it a shot.

    The core — literally — of [Shinsaku Hiura]’s design is a 3D-printed cylinder with a spiral groove in its outside circumference. The cylinder rotates inside a cage with vertical bars; the bars and the grooves are sized to trap 6-mm AirSoft BBs, which are fed into the groove by a port in the stationary base of the display. BBs are fed into the groove at the right position to form characters, which move upwards as the cylinder rotates. Just watch the video below — it explains it far better than words can.

  • PicoVoice offline Voice AI engine gets free tier for up to 3 users - CNX Software

    PicoVoice offline Voice AI engine has now a free tier that allows people to create custom wake words and voice commands easily for up to three users on any hardware including Raspberry Pi and Arduino boards.

    I first learned about PicoVoice about a year ago when the offline voice AI engine was showcased on a Raspberry Pi fitted with ReSpeaker 4-mic array to showcase the company’s Porcupine custom wake word engine, and Rhino Speech-to-Intent engine. The demo would support 9 wake words with Alexa, Bumblebee, Computer, Hey Google, Hey Siri, Jarvis, Picovoice, Porcupine, and Terminator.

  • This Arduino device can detect which language is being spoken using tinyML | Arduino Blog

    Although smartphone users have had the ability to quickly translate spoken words into nearly any modern language for years now, this feat has been quite tough to accomplish on small, memory-constrained microcontrollers. In response to this challenge, Hackster.io user Enzo decided to create a proof-of-concept project that demonstrated how an embedded device can determine the language currently being spoken without the need for an Internet connection.

    This so-called “language detector” is based on an Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is connected to a common PCA9685 motor driver that is, in turn, attached to a set of three micro servo motors — all powered by a single 9V battery. Enzo created a dataset by recording three words: “oui” (French), “si” (Italian), and “yes” (English) for around 10 minutes each for a total of 30 minutes of sound files. He also added three minutes of random background noise to help distinguish between the target keywords and non-important words.

Sifive Essential 6-Series RISC-V processors target Linux

  • Sifive Essential 6-Series RISC-V processors target Linux, real-time applications

    SiFive has been busy. Just a few days after SiFive Performance P650 announcement, the company has announced the SiFive Essential 6-Series RISC-V processor family starting with four 64-bit/32-bit real-time core, and two Linux capable application cores, plus the SiFive 21G3 release with various improvements to existing families.

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today's howtos

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    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

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