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Linus Torvalds Announces First Linux Kernel 5.13 Release Candidate

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Linux

It’s time to get busy again and test the next major Linux kernel branch, Linux 5.13, which had a fairly big merge window, according to Linus Torvalds. However, it looks like things have proceeded fairly smoothly and the first Release Candidate is now ready for public testing.

Once again, the biggest changes in Linux kernel 5.13 appear to be made around the AMD GPU open-source graphics driver for AMD Radeon GPUs, which received a “huge dump” of descriptor header files, but there’s a lot more to look for in the upcoming Linux kernel release compared to Linux kernel 5.12.

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Phoronix and the original

  • Linux 5.13-rc1 Released Following "A Fairly Big Merge Window"

    Linus Torvalds just issued Linux 5.13-rc1 as a Mother's Day kernel test release that also marks the closure of the merge window for the cycle.

    Torvalds wrote in the announcement about the size of this merge window, "This was - as expected - a fairly big merge window, but things seem to have proceeded fairly smoothly. Famous last words. There's a lot in there, although the diffstat looks pretty skewed - once again due to some amdgpu header files...The shortlog would be even bigger than usual, with 1800+ developers and 14k+ non-merge commits (over 15k commits counting merges)."

  • Linux 5.13-rc1
    So two weeks are over, and the merge window is closed.
    
    This was - as expected - a fairly big merge window, but things seem to
    have proceeded fairly smoothly. Famous last words.
    
    There's a lot in there, although the diffstat looks pretty skewed -
    once again due to some amdgpu header files. Those things are huge, and
    autogenerated from hardware descriptions, and the end result is that
    they often end up overshadowing all the other changes if you only look
    at the diffs.  In fact, over a third of the diff for 5.13-rc1 is just
    from those kinds of header files.
    
    So ignore that part if you want to look at what changed. That will
    still show driver changes at 60% of the diff, which is all normal.
    It's all over the place, although gpu and networking stands out (yes,
    the gpu updates are noticeable even when ignoring the amd header
    files).
    
    Outside of drivers, it's a bit of everything: arch updates (arm, x86
    and powerpc dominate), documentation (devicetree bindings dominate -
    I'm not sure it should count as documentation, but there's also a fair
    amount of translation work), tooling,  and obviously all the expected
    core kernel stuff: filesystems, process handling, VM and core
    networking.
    
    The shortlog would be even bigger than usual, with 1800+ developers
    and 14k+ non-merge commits (over 15k commits counting merges). So
    appended is my usual rc1 "merge shortlog". And as always, this credits
    the people I merge from - if you want to see details about authorship
    and exact commits, you will need to go to the git tree itself.
    
    The merge log is obviously woefully inadequate, with the diffstat
    summary kind of showing why:
    
      12015 files changed, 631309 insertions(+), 246239 deletions(-)
    
    it really is a fair amount of stuff, all over the place.
    
    Go test,
                         Linus
    

Kernel prepatch 5.13-rc1

  • Kernel prepatch 5.13-rc1

    The first 5.13 kernel prepatch is out for testing, and the merge window is closed for this development cycle. "This was - as expected - a fairly big merge window, but things seem to have proceeded fairly smoothly. Famous last words." In the end, 14,231 non-merge changesets were pulled into the mainline during the merge window — more than were seen during the entire 5.12 cycle.

Download The First Linux Kernel 5.13 Release Candidate

Torvalds closes merge window for Linux 5.13 with support...

  • 'A fair amount of stuff, all over the place': Torvalds closes merge window for Linux 5.13 with support for Apple M1

    Linus Torvalds has closed the merge window for Linux 5.13 with the first release candidate, which includes initial support for Apple's M1 processor along with "a fair amount of stuff, all over the place."

    The closing of the merge window means that the new code which has been accepted by the Linux development community as both desirable and sufficiently stable is included in the first release candidate for the new kernel, which is generally feature-complete. The work is now focused on stability and fixing problems, ahead of the stable release which usually follows within a couple of months.

    On this occasion Torvalds said that "there's a lot in there," of which a third is auto-generated from hardware descriptions and 60 per cent driver changes. That still leaves room for a number of significant new features. Overall, there are 12,015 files changes, 631,309 insertions, and 246,239 deletions.

    The changes include initial support for Apple M1 processors, based on the work of Arnd Bergmann, Hector Martin, and others.

Preliminary Apple M1 Support Added To Latest Linux Kernel

  • Preliminary Apple M1 Support Added To Latest Linux Kernel

    Linux Torvalds has announced availability of Linux kernel 5.13 release candidate that adds preliminary support for Apple's M1 system-on-chip along with a number of improvements to the operating system itself, reports 9to5Linux.com.

    The most interesting addition to Linux kernel 5.13 is preliminary support for Apple's M1 SoC, something that developers have been working on for months now. While Linux does support Arm and can run on various SoCs such as the Raspberry Pi, Apple's M1 is considerably different from other processors, so making Linux run on this chip was a tough challenge.

    At this point Linux 5.13-RC1 can boot on an M1-based system, but does not support all features of the SoC. For example, GPU support is still not even half-baked.

    "This is just basic bring-up, but it lays a solid foundation and is probably the most challenging up-streaming step we'll have to do, at lease until the GPU stuff is done," said Hector Martin, a software developer, reports The Register.

    Availability of Linux kernel 5.13-RC1 means that the Linux development community finds that the new build is almost ready for release, with an anticipated final release due in June / July.

Looking At An Early Performance Regression In Linux 5.13

  • Looking At An Early Performance Regression In Linux 5.13 - Scheduler Related

    Since the Linux 5.13 merge window began settling down and especially now with 5.13-rc1 out the door, I've been ramping up performance testing of the Linux 5.13 kernel. So far I've been seeing one area where the kernel is regression and stems from the scheduler changes this cycle.

    I'm still early on in the benchmarking process in testing a range of systems with Linux 5.13 compared to 5.12 stable, but from testing on an Intel Core i9 11900K "Rocket Lake" system in particular was a bit intrigued by one of the performance drops on 5.13 that led me to looking closer at it yesterday...

    On the Rocket Lake system as well as a Core i5 9400F system (among the few systems tested so far with preliminary benchmarks), the context switching performance as measured by the well known Stress-NG took a nose dive...

Latest Linux kernel introduces preliminary Apple M1 support

  • Latest Linux kernel introduces preliminary Apple M1 support

    The latest version of the Linux kernel, Linux 5.13, introduces support for Apple's M1 system-on-chip and is now available as a release candidate.

    Apple M1 support was previously reported for Linux 5.13, though no release date was mentioned at the time. On Tuesday, however, Linux kernel principal developer Linus Torvalds announced that the release candidate version is now available for public testing.

    Although security researchers have successfully booted Linux on Apple Silicon in the past, it required some fairly technical workarounds. With preliminary support in Linux 5.13, Linux distributions and systems will have a much easier time running on Apple's SoC.

Linux Kernel 'Linux 5.13' Will Support Apple M1 System-on-Chip

  • Linux Kernel 'Linux 5.13' Will Support Apple M1 System-on-Chip | Now Available for Public Testing

    The Apple M1 chip has recently started to gain much traction and is now fully recognized as another possible processor to choose for high-end performance. It seems like the recognition now stems past Apple as the latest version of the popular Linux kernel known as the Linux 5.13 would introduce support for Apple's M1!

    Apple M1 on Linux

    Apple made headlines for deciding to step away from their long-time chip supplier, Intel, as the company decided to manufacture their own CPUs. Apple made headlines with their M1 chip and are now spreading the chip to other units that they own. Aside from Apple, it now looks like Linux is recognizing its power.

    According to the story by AppleInsider, the Linux 5.13 reportedly introduces support for Apple's popular M1 system-on-chip and is currently available as a certain release candidate. The Apple M1 support was also previously reported for the Linux 5.13 but there was no release date given during that time.

Linux Kernel 5.13 RC brings official support for Apple’s M1 chip

  • Linux Kernel 5.13 RC brings official support for Apple’s M1 chip

    It was reported last month that Linux was about to get official support for the new Macs with the M1 chip, which could potentially arrive in June with the upcoming Linux Kernel 5.13 release. The first RC build of Linux Kernel 5.13 was released this week, and Linus Torvalds himself confirmed that it supports Apple’s M1 chip.

    As seen in the release notes of the latest Linux update, the new 5.13 Kernel adds support for several chips based on the ARM architecture — including the Apple M1. This means that users will finally be able to run Linux natively on the new M1 MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and iMac.

    It was already possible to run Linux on M1 Macs via virtual machines and even with a port from Corellium, but none of these alternatives run natively — which means they don’t take advantage of the maximum performance of the M1 chip. However, some developers had been working to include native support for M1 in the Linux Kernel, and now this has become a reality.

Linux 5.13 adds support for Apple Silicon

  • Linux 5.13 adds support for Apple Silicon

    Last year, Apple announced that the Mac will be transitioning from Intel to Apple Silicon – its own in-house designed chips and manufactured by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC). The transition is to take two years to complete, as said by Apple CEO Tim Cook during the Keynote at the annual developers conference WWDC (2020).

    It takes time to add native support for apps and even kernels. It was recently reported by AppleInsider that the latest version of Linux kernel (version 5.13) has introduced support for Apple Silicon. The kernel will now work with the first Apple Silicon chip – the M1. Linux 5.13 is now available as a release candidate which means it is now available for testing by the general public.

Upcoming Linux Kernel 5.13 Release to Bring Official Support...

  • Upcoming Linux Kernel 5.13 Release to Bring Official Support for Apple’s M1 Chip

    Linux is getting official support for Apple’s M1 Macs, and we could see a June release date for the upcoming Linux Kernel 5.13 release. The first Release Candidate build of Linux Kernel 5.13 was released this week, and Linus Torvalds has confirmed that it supports Apple’s M1 chip.

    The release notes of the new 5.13 Kernel notes that it adds support for several chips based on the ARM architecture, including the M1. This will offer users the ability to run Linux natively on the new M1 MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and iMac.

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