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Linux 5.12 Kernel Officially Released, This Is What’s New

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Linux

More than two months in the works, Linux kernel 5.12 is here with dynamic thermal power management mechanism, initial support for zoned block devices for the Btrfs file system, netfilter improvements, high compression LZ4 mode support for the F2FS file system, and support for non-uniform memory access (NUMA) systems for the RISC-V 64-bit architecture.

Kfence, a new memory-debugging tool, has been added as well in Linux 5.12, which now supports the open source ACRN reference hypervisor designed for embedded IoT development, Playstation 5 DualSense wireless game controllers, Nintendo 64 game controllers, and the the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2.

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Phoronix and original

  • Linux 5.12 Released With Intel Xe Variable Rate Refresh, Clang LTO, KFENCE + More

    After a week delay, the Linux 5.12 kernel was just released as stable.

    Linus Torvalds wrote in the brief 5.12 announcement, "Thanks to everybody who made last week very calm indeed, which just makes me feel much happier about the final 5.12 release."

  • Linux 5.12
    Thanks to everybody who made last week very calm indeed, which just
    makes me feel much happier about the final 5.12 release.
    
    Both the shortlog (appended) and the diffstat are absolutely tiny, and
    it's mainly just a random collection of small fixes in various areas:
    arm64 devicetree files, some x86 perf event fixes (and a couple of
    tooling ones), various minor driver fixes (amd and i915 gpu fixes
    stand out, but honestly, that's not because they are big, but because
    the rest is even smaller), a couple of small reverts, and a few
    locking fixes (one kvm serialization fix, one memory ordering fix for
    rwlocks).
    
    Anyway, this obviously means that I'll start the merge window for 5.13
    tomorrow. But I'd ask that even developers champing at the bit to get
    their shiny new code merged please spend a bit of time running and
    checking out 5.12.
    
    Despite the extra week, this was actually a fairly small release
    overall.  Judging by linux-next, 5.13 will be making up for it.
    
             Linus
    

The 5.12 kernel has been released

  • The 5.12 kernel has been released

    Linus Torvalds has released the 5.12 kernel. "Thanks to everybody who made last week very calm indeed, which just makes me feel much happier about the final 5.12 release." Headline features in 5.12 include the removal of a number of obsolete, (mostly) 32-bit Arm subarchitectures, atomic instructions for BPF, conditional file lookups with LOOKUP_CACHED, support for zoned block devices in the Btrfs filesystem, threaded NAPI polling in the network stack, filesystem ID mapping, support for building the kernel with Clang link-time optimization, the KFENCE kernel-debugging tool, and more.

A couple more...

  • Next Mainline Linux Kernel 5.12 Released with Essential Improvements

    Linux Kernel 5.11 was an impressive release with the support for new hardware that’s probably out-of-stock till the end of 2022.

    Now, almost after 2 months of work and a week of delay for a release candidate version 8, Linux Kernel 5.12 is here.

    The improvements span across many things that include processor support, laptop support, new hardware support, storage enhancements, and a few more essential driver additions.

  • Linux Kernel 5.12 Released. This is What's New

    Linux Kernel 5.12 is available for download. We give you a brief of the new features and how to install the latest Kernel.

Linux Kernel 5.12 Released With Many Essential Additions

  • Linux Kernel 5.12 Released With Many Essential Additions

    Linux Kernel 5.12 brings Sony PlayStation 5 DualSense controller driver and Linux Kernel 5.13 development window kicks off with this stable release.

    Linux Kernel 5.12 is a well-turned release with many essential additions.

    [...]

    Linux Kernel 5.12 introduces the concept of idmapped mounts. This allows to map the user id of a mount to a different one. This makes possible to share files more easily between multiple users or multiple machines especially in complex scenarios. ID mapping also makes possible to share files from the host with unprivileged containers without having to change ownership permanently.

    This initial implementation comes with ports for FAT and ext4, with other file systems being prepared in next releases.

A couple more

  • Linus Torvalds: Linux 5.12 is a small release but the next one is going to be bigger

    Linus Torvalds announced the arrival of the Linux kernel 5.12 on Sunday, which he flagged as a small update – but one that will be followed by bigger changes in version 5.13.

    "Both the shortlog (appended) and the diffstat are absolutely tiny, and it's mainly just a random collection of small fixes in various areas," Torvalds noted.

  • Linus Torvalds hints at massive Linux update coming soon

    Even as he rolls out the latest 5.12 release of the Linux kernel after a week-long delay, principal developer Linus Torvalds has warned that the next release might be even bigger in terms of new features.

    The release cycle for the 5.12 release was an eventful one. Despite seeing off major disruptions, including both natural disasters and man-made incidents, Torvalds was forced to delay the release by a week to allow developers some extra time to make sure everything was in order.

    Linux kernel RCs are pushed out every Sunday by Torvalds, typically seven times per release cycle. Sometimes though, he allows for an extra week of testing, primarily due to the number of changes in the release cycle, as in 5.12.

4 more

  • Linux Kernel 5.12 Released! How to Install it in Ubuntu

    The Ubuntu Mainline Kernel Archive provides the new kernel packages via DEB files.

    The mainline build kernels do not include any Ubuntu-provided drivers or patches. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use.
    For those prefer using a graphical tool, see this tool to install the latest Kernel.

  • Linux Kernel 5.12 Released, This is What’s New

    The Linux 5.12 kernel has been released – albeit a week later than original scheduled.

    Linus Torvalds announced the release over on the Linux kernel mailing list, writing: “…thanks to everybody who made last week very calm indeed, which just makes me feel much happier about the final 5.12 release.” He adds that despite the extra week’s grace this is “actually a fairly small release overall”.

    I reckon Linus’ definition of ‘small’ may differ from ours, so read on to run through the biggest changes and most notable additions proffered in the latest Linux kernel update.

  • As Linux 5.12 released, Linus Torvalds warns next version will probably be rather large

    Linus Torvalds has emitted version 5.12 of the Linux kernel, and warned the next version looks like a whopper.

    "Thanks to everybody who made last week very calm indeed, which just makes me feel much happier about the final 5.12 release," he said in his announcement, while referencing last week's post in which he worried the release may slip a week.

    [...]

    Among the known additions coming to version 5.13 are support for Apple's M1 silicon, the addition of a wireless WAN subsystem, more RISC-V support, and provisions for Intel's standalone GPUs.

  • Slackware Beta: Kernel 5.12 Has Arrived in Testing

    Hell yeah, on 12 th April Pat Volkerding announced the first beta of what will eventually be Slackware 15.0 using a 5.10.29 kernel, ending the changelog entry on his typical cheery note. "I'm going to go ahead and call this a beta even though there's still no fix for the illegal instruction issue with 32-bit mariadb. But there should be soon (thanks ponce!) No build regressions noted with the official gcc-10.3 release. Please report any new (or old) issues on the LQ Slackware forum. Enjoy! :-)".

Linux Kernel 5.12 Released

  • Linux Kernel 5.12 Released

    After two months of development, Linus Torvalds has released the latest version of the Linux kernel, saying that “despite the extra week, this was actually a fairly small release overall.”

    According to the KernelNewbies page, this release introduces idmapped mounts, which let you “map the user id of a mount to a different one. This makes it possible to share files more easily between multiple users or multiple machines especially in complex scenarios.”

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