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Ubuntu Core 20 secures Linux for IoT

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Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical’s Ubuntu Core 20, a minimal, containerised version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS for IoT devices and embedded systems, is now generally available. This major version bolsters device security with secure boot, full disk encryption, and secure device recovery. Ubuntu Core builds on the Ubuntu application ecosystem to create ultra-secure smart things.

“Every connected device needs guaranteed platform security and an app store” said Mark Shuttleworth. “Ubuntu Core 20 enables innovators to create highly secure things and focus entirely on their own unique features and apps, with confinement and security updates built into the operating system.”

Ubuntu Core 20 addresses the cost of design, development and maintenance of secure devices, with regular, automated and reliable updates included. Canonical works with silicon providers and ODMs to streamline the entire process of bringing a new device to market. The company and its partners offer SMART START, a fixed-price engagement to launch a device that covers consulting, engineering and updates for the first 1000 devices on certified hardware, to reduce IoT project risk.

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Also: Ubuntu Core 20 Released For IoT/Embedded Linux Use-Cases

Ubuntu Core 20 Released for IoT and Embedded Device Makers

  • Ubuntu Core 20 Released for IoT and Embedded Device Makers

    Ubuntu Core is a minimal, containerised version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS designed for use on embedded systems and IoT devices. It boasts a super-secure design with support for transactional updates through Snap apps.

    A raft of leading companies already use the tech in some form or another in industrial and consumer IoT devices, including Dell, Plus One Robotics, and Jabil.

    The latest version is Ubuntu Core 20. This version intros a handful of security-focused features including cryptographically authenticated boot process, full disk encryption, and manual and remote recovery mode.

Canonical launches Ubuntu Core 20 for IoT devices

  • Canonical launches Ubuntu Core 20 for IoT devices

    Canonical has announced the general availability of Ubuntu Core 20, a stripped back version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS designed for IoT devices and embedded systems. According to the company, this update improves device security with the inclusion of secure boot, full disk encryption and secure device recovery.

    Ubuntu Core is available for many popular x86 and ARM single board computers making it pretty accessible. IoT devices are not always easy to update so Canonical has configured Ubuntu Core to provide automated and reliable updates out of the box so end users don’t need to worry about updating their devices. While an LTS is usually supported for five years, it provides business-critical devices with 10 years of support.

Ubuntu Core 20 Released

  • Ubuntu Core 20 Released

    Canonical released today Ubuntu Core 20 designed for IoT and embedded devices. Ubuntu Core 20 is now available to download. If you are not aware of Ubuntu Core 20 then it is a minimal, containerised version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Ubuntu Core 20 is a major release after the previous version, Ubuntu Core 18.

  • Ubuntu Core 20 adds secure boot and startup service

    Canonical has released Ubuntu Core 20, an embedded variant of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, adding secure boot and full disk encryption. There is also a Smart Start service to help launch Ubuntu Core based products.

    Canonical announced the release of Ubuntu Core 20, its minimalist, containerized version of Ubuntu Linux for IoT devices and embedded systems. Following earlier releases such as Ubuntu Core 18 from 2019, Ubuntu Core 20 is based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, the long-term support release that preceded the recent Ubuntu 20.10.

Secure to the core: IoT Ubuntu Core Linux 20 released

  • Secure to the core: IoT Ubuntu Core Linux 20 released

    Specifically, the new Ubuntu Core supports controlled and cost-effective unattended software updates for device families. These fix everything, everywhere, fast on your shipping devices. It also includes a minimal attack surface for OS and apps, with no unused software installed in the base OS. This, in turn, reduces the size and frequency of security updates.

    Helping to lock down Ubuntu Core, all snaps are strictly confined and isolated. This way, even if an application is compromised, the design limits the damage it can cause. In addition, provable software integrity and secure boot prevents unauthorized software installation, with hardware roots-of-trust. Full disk encryption eases compliance with privacy requirements for sensitive consumer, industrial, healthcare, or smart city applications.

Ubuntu Core 20 Brings Better Industrial IoT Control

  • Ubuntu Core 20 Brings Better Industrial IoT Control

    Canonical on Feb. 2 made available Ubuntu Core 20, a minimal, containerized version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS for Internet of Things (IoT) devices and embedded systems.

    This major version bolsters device security with secure boot, full disk encryption, and secure device recovery. Ubuntu Core builds on the Ubuntu application ecosystem to create ultra-secure smart things.

    “Every connected device needs guaranteed platform security and an app store” said Mark Shuttleworth. “Ubuntu Core 20 enables innovators to create highly secure things and focus entirely on their own unique features and apps, with confinement and security updates built into the operating system.”

    Ubuntu Core powers industrial IoT devices. Innovative companies are using it to build and commercialize consumer-fronting devices, ranging from coffee brewers to medical devices, according to Galem Kayo, a product manager at Canonical.

    The new Ubuntu Core version 20 boasts notable new device security innovations. Given the increasing numbers and sophistication of attacks by individual and state-sponsored cybercriminals, Canonical’s efforts should be welcomed by both IoT device makers and their customers, according to Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

More puff pieces

  • Ubuntu Core 20 offers secure Linux for IoT devices

    Canonical is making Ubuntu Core 20, a minimal, containerized version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS for IoT devices and embedded systems, generally available from today.

    It improves device security with secure boot, full disk encryption, and secure device recovery and builds on the Ubuntu application ecosystem in order to create ultra-secure smart things.

    Ubuntu Core 20 addresses the cost of design, development and maintenance of secure devices, with regular, automated and reliable updates included. Canonical is working with silicon providers and ODMs to streamline the entire process of bringing a new device to market. To help developers the company and its partners offer SMART START, a fixed-price engagement to launch a device that covers consulting, engineering and updates for the first 1000 devices on certified hardware, to reduce IoT project risk.

  • Ubuntu Core 20 for IoT devices promises better security for edge devices

    Ubuntu publisher Canonical has announced the general availability of Ubuntu Core 20, the containerized version of its popular Linux flavor built for IoT and embedded systems. Canonical describes this as a major release, and it brings Ubuntu Core in line with Ubuntu's 20.04 release that came early in 2020.

Ubuntu Core 20 released for secure Linux IoT devices

  • Ubuntu Core 20 released for secure Linux IoT devices and embedded systems

    Canonical has just released Ubuntu Core 20, a minimal, containerized version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS for IoT devices and embedded systems. The company highlights several security improvements and features of the new version of the Linux-based operating system with secure boot, full disk encryption, secure device recovery, and secure containers.

    Ubuntu Core 20 is said to come with all benefits from Ubuntu 20.04 LTS such as regular, automated updates, the ability to manage custom app stores, and offers a longer 10-year support window.

Containerize all the things with Ubuntu Core 20

  • Containerize all the things with Ubuntu Core 20

    Canonical released Ubuntu Core 20 today, and it is now available for download. If you're already familiar with Ubuntu Core, the standout new feature is added device security with secure boot, full-disk encryption, and secure device recovery baked in. If you're not familiar with Ubuntu Core yet... read on!

    The key difference between regular Ubuntu and Ubuntu Core is the underlying architecture of the system. Traditional Linux distributions rely mostly on traditional package systems—deb, in Ubuntu's case—while Ubuntu Core relies almost entirely on Canonical's relatively new snap package format.

    Ubuntu Core also gets a full 10 years of support from Canonical rather than the five years traditional Ubuntu LTS releases get. But it's a bit more difficult to get started with, since you need an Ubuntu SSO account to even log in to a new Ubuntu Core installation in the first place.

Better security for IoT devices promises Ubuntu Core 20

  • Better security for IoT devices promises Ubuntu Core 20

    Canonical’s Ubuntu Core 20, a minimal, containerised version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS for the Internet of Things (IoT) devices and embedded systems, is now generally available. This version claims to bolster device security with secure boot, full disk encryption, and secure device recovery.

    Ubuntu Core 20 addresses the cost of design, development and maintenance of secure devices, with regular, automated and reliable updates included. Canonical works with silicon providers and ODMs to streamline the entire process of bringing a new device to market. The company and its partners offer SMART START, a fixed-price engagement to launch a device that covers consulting, engineering and updates for the first 1000 devices on certified hardware, to reduce IoT project risk.

    Today’s release builds on established strengths for Ubuntu Core. Best-in-class security updates support controlled and cost-effective unattended software updates for OEM fleets that fix everything, everywhere, fast. A minimal attack surface for OS and apps, with no unused software installed in the base OS, reduces the size and frequency of security updates. All snaps on Ubuntu Core devices are strictly confined and isolated, limiting the damage from a compromised application. Provable software integrity and secure boot prevents unauthorised software installation, with hardware roots-of-trust. Full disk encryption eases compliance with privacy requirements for sensitive consumer, industrial, healthcare or smart city applications.

Canonical Introduces Ubuntu Core 20 To Secure IoT Devices...

  • Canonical Introduces Ubuntu Core 20 To Secure IoT Devices & Embedded Systems

    Canonical just introduced Ubuntu core 20, which is a minimal version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS made primarily for IoT devices and large container deployments.

    They announced that Ubuntu Core 20 is now generally available, and the main focus is on providing security for IoT and edge devices. Moreover, this release also brings in some new features such as secure boot, full-disk encryption, and secure device recovery.

This new Ubuntu release will help secure IoT devices

  • This new Ubuntu release will help secure IoT devices

    Canonical, the developers of the Ubuntu desktop Linux distro, have announced a containerized version of the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release designed especially for use on embedded and IoT devices.

    According to Canonical, Ubuntu Core already powers "tens of thousands of industrial and consumer IoT devices run Ubuntu Core, brought to market by Bosch Rexroth, Dell, ABB, Rigado, Plus One Robotics, Jabil, and more."

    The company describes the new Ubuntu Core 20 as a major release, with special emphasis on its security enhancements. “Ubuntu Core 20 enables innovators to create highly secure things and focus entirely on their own unique features and apps, with confinement and security updates built into the operating system,” remarked Canonical’s CEO and founder Mark Shuttleworth.

Canonical Releases Ubuntu Core 20 for Iot Devices...

  • Canonical Releases Ubuntu Core 20 for Iot Devices and Embedded Systems.

    Canonical released a minimal containerised version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (released early 2020) specifically for IoT devices and embedded systems.
    Ubuntu Core is an operating system for industry and consumer devices. It is available for both x86 and ARM computers. Additional features compared to previous Core operating systems are secure boot, full drive encryption, and secure device recovery. An enormous benefit in terms of security is reducing the attack surface due to both the containerization of the OS and the included app store. In the app-store you can download so-called ‘snaps’, which are running in a strictly confined and isolated setting. This limits the damage in case an application running on the OS is compromised.

    [...]

    Ubuntu has been pushing hard to be the go-to operating system for robotics. One example of an existing robotics application running Ubuntu is the one of Plus One Robotics. They build robot perception software and solutions for material handling in industrial settings. Their software builds on the ROS ecosystem, which makes the step from development to production smaller. Although ROS 2 currently runs on Ubuntu, Mac and Windows, most ROS developers are still running Ubuntu to program and control their robotics applications.

Ubuntu Core 20 Linux Gets Bolstered Security, Full Disk Encrypt

  • Ubuntu Core 20 Linux Gets Bolstered Security, Full Disk Encryption for Embedded, IoT

    Canonical’s latest Ubuntu Core 20 Linux operating system now features several important security updates, including anti-malware and anti-hijacking technologies and full-disk encryption capabilities.

    The new version of Ubuntu Core 20, which is built as a minimal, containerized version of Ubuntu Linux 20.04 for use with embedded systems and IoT, was announced by the company this week. Ubuntu Core has been in production since 2016.

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