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today's leftovers

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Misc

  • MacBook2,1 and MacBook1,1

    There is an Apple laptop called the macbook1,1 from 2006 which uses the same i945 chipset as the ThinkPad X60/T60. A developer (Mono Moosbart) ported the Macbook2,1 to coreboot, working alongside Vladimir Serbinenko. The ROM images also work on the macbook1,1. Libreboot’s support and documentation for this is based on the Libreboot project, which also supports macbook2,1

    Some macbook2,1 models are late 2006, others are early 2007. You do not need to use external flashing equipment when flashing the MacBook2,1 but the MacBook1,1 requires external flashing equipment while running Apple EFI firmware.

    Macbook2,1 laptops come with Core 2 Duo processors which support 64-bit operating systems (and 32-bit). The MacBook1,1 uses Core Duo processors (supports 32-bit OS but not 64-bit), and it is believed that this is the only difference.

  • So long, home T1 line; hello, hacking the T1 router

    Floodgap has had a T1 line since I moved into this house in 2011. I'm one of those weirdos who runs my own hardware and prefers to avoid co-lo so that I can access things whenever I want despite the additional logistical complexity, and also acts as useful immunity against acquiring other expensive hobbies. The area was boonies-ish when I moved here (big house, cheap price, bottom of the market after the housing crash), arguably still is, and for at least several years there was no DSL due to its distance from the central office (fiber? hahahaha). Cable was around, but the only cable provider at the time refused to pull a run or even quote me a price to do so despite sending contractors on three separate occasions to scope out the site. After several weeks of downtime culminating in me making a formal complaint to the Public Utilities Commission, they agreed to stop messing around and released me from the contract. Of course, by then I was down for nearly a month.

  • ICP NV1 Network Video Recorder features Tiger-Lake processor and iRIS Xe GPU

    Germany based ICP unveiled a Network Video Recorder built around Intel’s 11th Gen Core (Tiger-Lake) combined with Xe graphics processor unit. The NVI supports up to 64GB DDR4 RAM (dual SO-DIMM slots) available in commercial grade and industrial grade.

    The NV1 supports a wide variety of Intel processors including 11th Gen Core-i3, i5, i7 and even the CeleronTM 6305E. The device also incorporates Intel’s iRIS Xe graphic units which is capable of decoding/recording and playback in 1080p on up to 64 channels. Additionally, the NV1 has support for deep learning for up to 10 channels at 7.1 TOPS.

  • [GSoC 2022] ARM port and device tree support

    This summer I will port Haiku to ARM and support some device tree-based storage device.

  • 2022 hardcore list of linux distributions without elogind and other systemd parts

    This list is going to be short and there may be a sublist of distros with a medium strict standard. We shall explain what the object is, below the short list (which we hope the community will assist in making longer as we have not been able to currently review the work of every distro and fork).

  • Linux is native to the PC, FreeBSD isn’t?

    But let’s get to the good stuff. Niggling technical issues aside, does Linux feel like you’re using a PC OS, and does FreeBSD make your machine feel more like a big iron UNIX box from back in the day? Liam writes: [...]

  • Conference Schedule - BSDCan 2022

    You can find the full conference information at the conference website. This schedule is subject to changes. This page will be updated when any changes occur.

More in Tux Machines

digiKam 7.7.0 is released

After three months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.7.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release. Read more

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world. Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.