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today's leftovers

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  • 7-Zip 21.07

    You can use 7-Zip on any computer, including a computer in a commercial organization. You don't need to register or pay for 7-Zip.

  • 2021: A year in open source [Ed: Very corporate-leaning slant, full of junk, FUD, and deliberate revisionism]
  • Shining a Light on Black Box Technology Used to Send People to Jail: 2021 Year in Review

    One of the most common forms of forensic programs is probabilistic genotyping software. It is used by the prosecution to examine DNA mixtures, where an analyst doesn't know how many people contributed to the sample (such as a swab taken from a weapon). These programs are designed to make choices about how to interpret the data, what information to disregard as likely irrelevant, and compute statistics based on how often the different genes appear in different populations—and all of the different programs do it differently. These assumptions and processes are subject to challenge by the person accused of a crime. For that challenge to be meaningful, the defense team must have access to source code and other materials used in developing the software.

    The software vendors claim both that the software contains valuable secrets that must not be disclosed and that their methods are so well-vetted that there's no point letting a defendant question them. Obviously, both can't be true, and in fact it's likely that neither is true.

    When a was finally able to access one of these programs, the Forensic Statistical Tool (FST), they discovered an undisclosed function and shoddy programming practices that could lead the software to implicate an innocent person. The makers of FST submitted sworn declarations about how they thought it worked, it had been subject to 'validation' studies where labs test some set of inputs to see if the results seem right, and so on. But any programmer knows that programs don't always do what you think you programmed them to do, and so it was with FST: in trying to fix one bug, they unwittingly introduced another serious error.

  • Fortnite servers were down for five hours, but now the game is back online

    A follow-up tweet at 3:10PM ET from the team said they were “continuing to work on a fix that will bring Fortnite back online and appreciate everyone’s patience.” As of 6PM ET, we hadn’t heard anything since, but at around 6:30PM ET players reported the game was working again, which we have been able to confirm.

    The Fortnite Status Twitter eventually tweeted to confirm the game is back up, promising that next week (or, next year) there will be details on “what we’re doing to help you make up for lost time.” It also noted some people might see an extra in-game present to open, but said the team is working on that.

  • Mico - A USB microphone based on Raspberry Pi RP2040 MCU - CNX Software

    Raspberry Pi RP2040 dual-core Cortex-M0+ microcontroller has found its way into Mico, a compact USB microphone with a PDM microphone providing better quality than cheap USB microphones going for one or two dollars or even 5 cents shipped for new Aliexpress users.

    The project started when Mahesh Venkitachalam (Elecronut Labs) was doing audio experiments with Machine Learning on the Raspberry Pi, and found out USB microphone dongles were extremely noisy with poor (distance) sensitivity, so he completed the project with a high-quality I2S microphone instead. He then had the idea of making his own USB microphone and found out Sandeep Mistry had already developed a Microphone Library for Pico, so he mostly had to work on the hardware that’s how Mico Raspberry Pi RP2040 USB microphone came to be.

  • Red Hat donates $10,000 and the Flatpak package will be official [Ed: IBM uses deep pockets to push itself as the 'standard']

    OBS Studio is one of the most successful projects of the free software However, it carries an important but, and that is that for many years it has not offered symmetric support between the platforms it supports, so the version for Linux has fewer features than the Windows version. Added to that is the fact that Ubuntu and Linux Mint are the only officially supported distributions, which will thankfully change shortly thanks to Flatpak.

    There seems to be interest in improving OBS Studio support for Linux, especially when it comes to covering the spectrum that goes beyond Ubuntu, since Red hat has donated $10,000 to the project in charge of the development and maintenance of the popular video recording and streaming software, which is used not only by free software enthusiasts, but also by professionals who publish on platforms such as Twitch and YouTube.

    In parallel with the Red Hat donation, the ground is being prepared for the Flatpak build of OBS Studio is official, something that should finish materializing with the release of version 27.2 of the application. What’s more, the beta version of OBS Studio 27.2 already ships the Flatpak version as an official build.

More in Tux Machines

digiKam 7.7.0 is released

After three months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.7.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release. Read more

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world. Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.