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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Using the MKR IoT Carrier board as a game console

    One of the first things many makers try to do when they receive a new piece of cool hardware is write a game for it. This is exactly what Johan Halmén did with his Breakout console that uses the Arduino MKR IoT Carrier board and an MKR1000 to both run and display the game.

    Breakout typically involves moving a paddle horizontally along the bottom of the screen to bounce a ball that can destroy the bricks above it. However, since the carrier board’s color OLED screen is circular, Halmén had to create a different version of this, which he calls “BreakIn.” His game features a bunch of hexagonal tiles in the middle and a paddle that moves around the outside that is controlled by the onboard accelerometer. This lets the player tilt the device to move their paddle quickly and accurately.

  • The ‘Hey Dude, Where Can I Get That Wallpaper?’ Blog Post

    If you’ve been lusting after the colourful desktop wallpapers I’ve been using in screenshots for articles and tweets during the past month or so, this post is for you.

    Quite a few of you have reached out to ask me for a link to the wallpapers you’ve glimpsed in a screenshot. You’ve also asked me where I get my wallpapers from. Rather than continuing to reply individually I figured I’d throw a quick post up here to share, and maybe reach those who did wonder but were too afraid to ask.

    Plus, a post on wallpapers gives me a chance to poke a bit of fun at Ubuntu 21.04 and its ‘unique’ desktop wallpaper:

  • Why Ubuntu Certification Matters for AIoT

    DFI is the world’s first industrial computer manufacturer to join the Ubuntu IoT Hardware Certification Partner Program. Three DFI products have been certified recently, which means you will have an out-of-box experience, secure, faster time to market with DFI products and Ubuntu.

  • Restarting Development of the KDE Connect iOS App for GSoC

    Google Summer of Code 2021 with KDE, How it started and what we aim to achieve

  • XmlListModels in Qt 6 – Life of a Developer

    I had a look at a small XmlListModel based project of mine and started migrating the code from Qt 5.12 to Qt 6.2. The code ports pretty cleanly, but there are some caveats to be aware of.

    As I’m lazy, I started by changing the imports from 2.12 to 6.2 and tried running the code. The first changes I had to make was to change the import from QtQuick.XmlListModel to QtQml.XmlListModel. I also learned that the import statement no longer requires a specific version to be specified – I’m not sure if I’m a fan of that quite yet.

  • Ricardo Garcia: Debugging shaders in Vulkan using printf

    Debugging programs using printf statements is not a technique that everybody appreciates. However, it can be quite useful and sometimes necessary depending on the situation. My past work on air traffic control software involved using several forms of printf debugging many times. The distributed and time-sensitive nature of the system being studied made it inconvenient or simply impossible to reproduce some issues and situations if one of the processes was stalled while it was being debugged.

    In the context of Vulkan and graphics in general, printf debugging can be useful to see what shader programs are doing, but some people may not be aware it’s possible to “print” values from shaders. In Vulkan, shader programs are normally created in a high level language like GLSL or HLSL and then compiled to SPIR-V, which is then passed down to the driver and compiled to the GPU’s native instruction set. That final binary, many times outside the control of user applications, runs in a quite closed and highly parallel environment without many options to observe what’s happening and without text input and output facilities. Fortunately, tools like glslang can generate some debug information when compiling shaders to SPIR-V and other tools like Nsight can use that information to let you debug shaders being run.

  • Open-Source Radeon Tools Updated With Expanded RDNA(2) Support, Other Features

    In addition to NVIDIA releasing new open-source GameWorks projects this week for the Game Developers Conference, AMD with their GPUOpen initiative has released several updated Radeon Windows/Linux tools.

    Radeon GPU Analyzer 2.5 is out today with expanded RDNA2 support (GFX1032 target support), support for analyzing OpenCL on RDNA/RDNA2/CDNA targets, live VGPR analysis and control-flow graph support within the Vulkan path, and a variety of other bug fixes and improvements to this graphics analyzer.

  • Launch: Hands-On With System76’s Keyboard

    Last week I received a package. At first, I didn’t know what it was. I wasn’t expecting anything from Amazon; I haven’t ordered anything there recently. Then I realized, “This has gotta be that keyboard from System76!” It took so long to get this that I had nearly forgotten that I was going to get a review unit.

    And sure enough, upon opening the package, it was none other than the Launch — the ultra-customizable keyboard from System76. It’s actually kind of nice having something other than a laptop to open up and review.

    The particular review unit I received is using jade switches, meaning they offer this sort of “click” sound when pressing a key. When ordering a unit, you can either get this or royal switches — tactile keys that aren’t as loud when pressing them. The only other thing you can customize when ordering one of these is how long you want the warranty period to last. Price comes to $285 with either type of switch.

More in Tux Machines

digiKam 7.7.0 is released

After three months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.7.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release. Read more

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world. Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.