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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 125

    Time flies and another two weeks of YaST development have passed. As in the previous report, we have to mention we invested quite some time learning and experimenting with technologies that will shape the role of YaST in particular and Linux installers in general in the future.

  • KDE Plasma 5.22 Released with Better Stability and Usability Across the Board

    The KDE Plasma desktop development has kicked into high gear and the latest release reflects newfound popularity and drive behind the open-source environment.

    The KDE Plasma developers have been incredibly busy this cycle, refactoring code, fixing bugs, and adding new features, all of which come together to bring even more performance to the desktop environment. The developers are so proud of this release (and the work they’ve achieved) that they created a showcase site to highlight everything found in KDE Plasma 5.22.

    The latest release is all about general eye candy and usability. And it shows.

    One of the most exciting new features to be found in KDE Plasma is called Adaptive Transparency, which will transition between translucent to opaque, depending on if there are any maximized windows. So when an app window is maximized, the panel will be opaque. If there are no maximized windows, the panel will be translucent. Of course, users can opt-out of this feature and make the panel always translucent or always opaque.

  • GitHub Notification Actions [Ed: KDE projects that outsource to Microsoft proprietary software and help a malicious monopoly]

    Calamares, a Linux system installer used by a few dozen different distro’s, is hosted on GitHub. The source code and issues live there, and the website is run from GitHub pages. This post meanders around GitHub actions – things that happen in response to changes in a project – and how I built a Matrix-notification-thing for Calamares.

  • God sim sandbox 'WorldBox' has a huge release out with lots of fun new toys

    WorldBox gives you a pixel-art god game all about doing whatever they hell you want. It's actually fantastic and a new release is out now. They only recently started supporting Linux with it (back in April), and now we're seeing all updates across all platforms at the same time which is great.

    I wasn't actually aware of just how popular it was until recently. The developer announced even just on their Discord, they've hit 200,000 people - so that gives you an idea of just how big it is. It's available for mobile too like Android, where there it's seen over 388,000 ratings so it's fantastic to have it on Linux too now. Not seen it?

  • NVIDIA Resizable BAR Performance - A Big Boost For Some Linux Games - Phoronix

    Back in March NVIDIA announced they would be supporting the GeForce RTX 30 series with Resizable BAR support via a video BIOS update for supported systems. Recently I've been looking at the performance of a GeForce RTX 3080 once flashing the graphics card under Linux with Resizable BAR support and the performance is quite compelling for Vulkan-based games where this functionality is working.

    Like with the AMD Smart Access Memory / Resizable BAR support, it requires a compatible CPU and motherboard and having the support enabled within the system BIOS. There is also graphics driver support required for Resizable BAR. NVIDIA hasn't talked much about the Linux driver for Resizable BAR but in fact the support is there with the latest stable driver series, assuming your video BIOS has the support available. It is important to note though the Resizable BAR support is implemented just for their Vulkan driver and not for OpenGL.

  • LibreOffice Annual Report 2020: Website, blogs and social media
  • The Mozilla Blog: What is the difference between the internet, browsers, search engines and websites?

    Real talk: this web stuff can get confusing. And it’s really important that we all understand how it works, so we can be as informed and empowered as possible. Let’s start by breaking down the differences between the internet, browsers, search engines and websites. Lots of us get these four things confused with each other and use them interchangeably, though they are different. In this case, the old “information superhighway” analogy comes in handy.

    [...]

    The internet is the superhighway’s system of roads, bridges and tunnels. It is the technical network and infrastructure that connect all the computers and devices that are online together across the world. Being connected to the internet means devices, and whoever is using them, can communicate with each other and share information.

  • "Free Software and Open Science" marks the XVI International Congress of Scientific Research

    The Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology (MESCYT) held the XVI International Congress of Scientific Research on “Free Software and Open Science”, an annual symposium to which this year national and international experts with vast experience were invited in the publication and dissemination of both topics.

    These are conceptually articulated in the open knowledge (open knowledge).

    The event was held on June 9, 10 and 11 under the direction of Dr. Manuel Madé, researcher professor and coordinator of management and scientific dissemination of the Technological Institute of Santo Domingo (INTEC).

  • Your spacesuit ran into a problem and needs to restart

    There are two things a spacewalker doesn't want to hear: "Can you turn it off and turn it on again?" and "What's that hissing sound?"

    The IT solution of the ancients reached orbit yesterday as one of a pair of astronauts tasked with fitting a new solar array to the International Space Station (ISS) had to make his way back to the airlock in order to restart his spacesuit.

    NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough was not in any great danger during what the US space agency delicately called an "issue" with his spacesuit's display and control module (designed to provide a spacewalker with information on the status of the suit). Controllers also noted a spike in the pressure reading for his sublimator (used to keep things cool) and so sent the astronaut back to the airlock to perform a restart.

  • You had one job: Akamai's Prolexic Denial-of-Service protection system fingered after users in Australia denied, er, services

    A wide range of internet-connected services in Australia, including banking systems, are experiencing an outage – and it looks like a hiccup at Akamai was at the heart of the problem.

    Reports of issues with news sites, gaming services, and – more critically – banking systems began to spread on Australian social media early Thursday afternoon local time. Uptime-tracking service Downdetector concurred, showing a massive spike in issues at Commonwealth Bank, Westpac, Bankwest, St.George Bank, Bank Australia, Bank of Melbourne, and others.

  • Episode 35, screenshot before release

    Tomorrow will be the release of Pepper&Carrot episode 35!

More in Tux Machines

digiKam 7.7.0 is released

After three months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.7.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release. Read more

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world. Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.