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Listen to LibrePlanet 2021, FSF Drops the Mic on Freenode

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GNU
  • Listen to LibrePlanet 2021 audio in your podcast app

    LibrePlanet 2021 had a fantastic range of talented speakers, and we want to showcase their terrific talks in every way we can. So if you prefer listening to viewing, it's time to plan a long afternoon walk, fire up your favorite free podcasting app, and listen to LibrePlanet!

    The audio from this year's entertaining and educational talks is now available. We have uploaded the sessions in conjunction with an RSS feed you can import into your favorite podcasting app or RSS reader, enabling you to listen using a free podcast app like AntennaPod via Android, or gPodder, if you are on your desktop computer.

  • Update to the FSF and GNU's plan to move IRC channels to Libera.Chat

    Following our announcement of a planned gradual switch from the Freenode IRC network to Libera.Chat, Freenode staff, with no notice, seized control of the #fsf and #gnu channels away from FSF staff and GNU volunteers during the early hours of Sunday morning (EDT). This happened despite members of Freenode staff participating in the community meeting, as well as reassuring us publicly and privately that they would respect and support the resulting review and our decision. These channels were seized without informing the FSF or GNU representatives of any disagreements Freenode staff had with our plan, whether by means of the group contact system or otherwise. Adding to the situation's instability was their switch to a new IRC daemon late last night, also without notice, which dropped all existing nicks and channels from the database.

    This has forced us to adjust our plans for the transition, a move that was already necessary due to an abrupt change in Freenode policy that occurred shortly after our announcement, which eliminated the distinction between # and ## channels that we planned to use to pass ownership of the #fsf and #gnu channels over to the wider free software community.

  • GStreamer: IRC Channel has moved from Freenode to OFTC

    Due to the widely reported issues at the Freenode IRC network, the official GStreamer discussion IRC channel has moved to #gstreamer on the OFTC IRC network alongside other Freedesktop projects.

  • Developer chat moving

    For years, most development discussion for Krita has happened on the #krita channel on the Freenode IRC network. IRC is a venerable chat system (that’s to say, it’s old and quirky) but it works very well for us because it’s free and open source software and because it treats chat as chat: it doesn’t keep logs for you if you’re not in the channel, there are many clients and interaction is simple and limited to just text.

    However, the freenode IRC network is no longer a good host for our development work. The people currently managing the network are doing very strange things, and the people who used to manage the network have created a new network, libera.chat.

  • Freenode Is IRC; As In "Dumbest Takeover In History"

    Just today morning, freenode pulled the trigger on their servers and removed all channels, all users, all settings… Everything. And they say that they have restarted the network and will move to a new “fork”:

    [Global Notice 1/3] We are moving past legacy freenode to a new fork. The new freenode is launched. You will slowly be disconnected and when you reconnect, you will be on the new freenode. We patiently await to welcome you in freedom’s holdout – the freenode.

    [Global Notice 2/3] If you’re looking to connect now, you can already /server chat.freenode.net 6697 (ssl) or 6667 (plaintext). It’s a new genesis for a new era. Thank you for using freenode, and Hello World, from the future. freenode is IRC. freenode is FOSS. freenode is freedom.

    [Global Notice 3/3] When you connect, register your nickname and your channel and get started. It’s a new world. We’re so happy to welcome you and the millions of others. We will be posting more information in the coming days on our website and twitter. Otherwise, see you on the other side!

    freenode, which was the largest active IRC network, was taken over by Andrew Lee; The Korean crown prince. Former staff and volunteers say that there was absolutely no way this selling process could be legal, but due to his wealth and powerful relations, the Korean prince could not be stopped.

    Until today, by his own stupidity.

    The madman paid a large sum of money to buy the network – which is not yet disclosed – and then, started taking channels from their owners whenever they mentioned LiberaChat; an alternative to the freenode IRC network.

    One channel after another… Almost all FOSS community migrated away in a matter of few days when the controversy started. netsplit.de showed that 30-40K users migrated to the new network in less than a week.

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