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today's leftovers

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  • the end of freenode

    My first experience with IRC was in 1999. I was in middle school, and a friend of mine ordered a Slackware CD from Walnut Creek CDROM. This was Slackware 3.4, and contained the GNOME 1.x desktop environment on the disc, which came with the BitchX IRC client.

    At first, I didn’t really know what BitchX was, I just thought it was a cool program that displayed random ascii art, and then tried to connect to various servers. After a while, I found out that an IRC client allowed you to connect to an IRC network, and get help with Slackware.

    At that time, freenode didn’t exist. The Slackware IRC channel was on DALnet, and I started using DALnet to learn more about Slackware. Like most IRC newbies, it didn’t go so well: I got banned from #slackware in like 5 minutes or something. I pleaded for forgiveness, in the way redolent of a middle schooler. And eventually, I got unbanned and stuck around for a while. That was my first experience with IRC.

    [...]

    For a few years, all was well, until the end of July 2002, when DALnet started being the target of Distributed Denial of Service attacks. We would of course, later find out that these attacks were at the request of Jason Michael Downey (Nessun), who had just launched a competing IRC network called Rizon.

    [...]

    In early 2006, lilo launched his Spinhome project. Spinhome was a fundraising effort so that lilo could get a mobile home to replace the double-wide trailer he had been living in. Some people saw him trying to fundraise while being the owner of freenode as a conflict of interest, which lead to a falling out with a lot of staffers, projects, etc. OFTC went from being a small network to a much larger network during this time.

    One side effect of this was that the atheme project got spun out into its own organization: atheme.org, which continues to exist in some form to this day.

    The atheme.org project was founded on the concept of promoting digital autonomy, which is basically the network equivalent of software freedom, and has advocated in various ways to preserve IRC in the context of digital autonomy for years. In retrospect, some of the ways we advocated for digital autonomy were somewhat obnoxious, but as they say, hindsight is always 20/20.

    [...]

    Self-hosting is really what makes IRC great: you can run your own server for your community and not be beholden to anyone else. As far as IRC goes, that’s the future I feel motivated to build.

    This concludes my coverage of the freenode meltdown. I hope people enjoyed it and also understand why freenode was important to me: without lilo‘s decision to take a chance on a dumbfuck kid like myself, I wouldn’t have ever really gotten as deeply involved in FOSS as I have, so to see what has happened has left me heartbroken.

  • A few thoughts on Fuchsia security

    Of course, under the hood, a lot is different. We built a brand new message-passing kernel, new connectivity stacks, component model, file-systems, you name it. And yes, there are a few security things I'm excited about.

  • Claudio Cambra: First week of Google Summer of Code 2021

    A year ago I’d just finished my History degree and I had no idea how to code. This year, I’m taking part in Google Summer of Code! I’m super happy to get the chance to learn more about how KDE software works, and to finally contribute to a project I’ve been using for years.

    Over the summer, I’ll be working with KDE developers to create productivity-focused components for Plasma Mobile that work with Akonadi, KDE’s personal information management framework. Akonadi is a super useful piece of kit: it allows developers to tap into a user’s synchronised e-mails, contacts, calendars, providing a seamless experience in productivity tools. I’ll be working on this project with my mentor Carl Schwan, who also helped me during my time doing Season of KDE, and Devin Lin.

  • Bas Nieuwenhuizen: Making Reading from VRAM less Catastrophic

    In an earlier article I showed how reading from VRAM with the CPU can be very slow. It however turns out there there are ways to make it less slow.

    The key to this are instructions with non-temporal hints, in particular VMOVNTDQA. The Intel Instruction Manual says the following about this instruction:

    “MOVNTDQA loads a double quadword from the source operand (second operand) to the destination operand (first operand) using a non-temporal hint if the memory source is WC (write combining) memory type. For WC memory type, the nontemporal hint may be implemented by loading a temporary internal buffer with the equivalent of an aligned cache line without filling this data to the cache. Any memory-type aliased lines in the cache will be snooped and flushed. Subsequent MOVNTDQA reads to unread portions of the WC cache line will receive data from the temporary internal buffer if data is available. “ (Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 2)

    This sounds perfect for our VRAM and WC System Memory buffers as we typically only read 16-bytes per instruction and this allows us to read entire cachelines at time.

    It turns out that Mesa already implemented a streaming memcpy using these instructions so all we had to do was throw that into our benchmark and write a corresponding memcpy that does non-temporal stores to benchmark writing to these memory regions.

  • Adrift - Alan Pope's blog

    Over the weekend I participated in FOSS Talk Live. Before The Event this would have been an in-person shindig at a pub in London. A bunch of (mostly) UK-based podcasters get together and record live versions of their shows in front of a “studio audience”. It’s mostly an opportunity for a bunch of us middle-aged farts who speak into microphones to get together, have a few beers and chat.
    Due to The Event, this year it was a virtual affair, done online via YouTube. Joe Ressington typically organised the in-person events, but with a lack of skills in video streaming, Martin Wimpress and Marius Quabeck stepped in to run the show behind-the-scenes.

  • PostgreSQL Weekly News - June 13, 2021
  • PostgreSQL JDBC 42.2.21 Released

    The JDBC project is proud to announce the latest version 42.2.21.

  • Vincent Fourmond: Solution for QSoas quiz #2: averaging several Y values for the same X value

    This post describes two similar solutions to the Quiz #2, using the data files found there. The two solutions described here rely on split-on-values. The first solution is the one that came naturally to me, and is by far the most general and extensible, but the second one is shorter, and doesn't require external script files.

More in Tux Machines

digiKam 7.7.0 is released

After three months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.7.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release. Read more

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world. Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.