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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • New “How Do You Fedora” video series to interview members of the community

    A common answer to the question “What’s your favorite part about Fedora?” is often “the community”. Well, what’s so special about it?

    The Fedora community shares the common values of the “Four Foundations”: Freedom, Friends, Features and First. Beyond that, although there are many great minds, not all of them think alike! Everyone contributes different approaches to problems, interesting ideas, and diverse perspectives. There is a place in Fedora for anyone who wants to help.

    That’s why we’re launching a new video series on the Fedora Youtube channel profiling some of Fedora’s various contributors and how they use Fedora. The goal is to get to know some community members better, especially in a time where in-person community events might not be practical.

  • Sharing supplemental groups with Podman containers

    Rootless Podman containers is a really cool feature that allows users to run almost all containers in their home directory without requiring any additional privileges.

    Rootless containers take advantage of the user namespace, as I explained in this blog.

    Sometimes the user namespace and other container security layers like SELinux make it more difficult to share content inside the container. We have seen many users who want to share system directories into their containers but fail with permission errors. These directories are usually shared via some group access, which allows the user to read/write content in the directories.

  • Developer Diaries: The Case of the Miscoded Credentials

    Cloud development practices and environments are evolving faster than ever. As developers, we are no strangers to adapting to the changing technology landscape. However, with a landscape that changes this often, it’s easy for us to get caught using the techniques we’ve used in the past to create the applications of the future.

    In this video, we talk out a problem in Upkar’s code where a 505 error that occurred due to miscoded credentials and ultimately discuss how we tackle problems like these with some vital app modernization tools.

  • Introducing Red Hat Vulnerability Scanner Certification

    As container and Kubernetes adoption in production has grown, concerns regarding container security, monitoring, data management and networking remain. In order to address these challenges, organizations must lay a secure foundation for modern workloads. Red Hat is an established leader in security for enterprise open source solutions - container security is Linux security. Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift offer a layered approach to securing containers and integrating security throughout the container lifecycle to support mission critical environments. We are continuously evolving to set new standards for security (e.g. DevSecOps) to support our partners and customers across open hybrid cloud.

    Today, we’re introducing the Red Hat Vulnerability Scanner Certification: a new certification to validate how security software partners use Red Hat security-related data for Red Hat products. This enables partners to deliver more reliable, consistent reporting to customers for containers to minimize false positives and other discrepancies. As a result, customers using Red Hat Certified partner security solutions can experience a more accurate process for assessing vulnerability risks of Red Hat products and packages including Red Hat Universal Base Images (UBI).

  • The history of open source risk reporting

    This year Red Hat released our 10th Product Security risk report, which reviews the vulnerabilities that affected our products during the previous year. Software, and our customers’ environments, have gotten more complex — and so has the IT security landscape.

    With so much information on Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs), our users have found it helpful to have one source of information about the risks posed to Red Hat technologies. And because Red Hat offers a full portfolio of technologies beyond Linux, we’ve expanded and improved the risk report to better reflect the issues that our customers care about. Now, let’s take a brief history lesson about how open source risk reporting has changed over the years.

  • Red Hat Software Now Available On IBM Power Systems

    IBM has announced availability of Red Hat software on IBM Power Systems as well as new IBM Power Systems hardware.

    IBM Power Systems now features Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Power Virtual Server leveraging OpenShift’s baremetal installeri, Red Hat Runtimes, and newly certified Red Hat Ansible Content Collections.

    Providing clients an optimized, production-level OpenShift platform to modernize traditional environments with cloud-native applications, the IBM Power Private Cloud Rack combines on-premises hardware, a complete software stack of IBM and Red Hat technology, and installation from IBM Systems Lab Services to deliver 49% lower cost per request as compared to similarly equipped x86-based platformsii.

    Today’s announcements include enhancements to IBM Power System’s capacity to scale compute capacity across the hybrid cloud on Linux, IBM i, and AIX.

More in Tux Machines

digiKam 7.7.0 is released

After three months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.7.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release. Read more

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world. Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.