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today's leftovers

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  • Canonical demoes its Kubernetes solutions live at KubeCon EU 2020!

    The wait is over – KubeCon & ClouNativeCon Virtual EU 2020 is finally here and we’re so thrilled to open our booth’s proverbial doors to all you fellow Kubernetes folks! We’ve already mentioned a couple of things about what you can expect to find at the Canonical and Ubuntu booth at KubeCon this year, but we know some of you have been asking more about the live demos that our technical team will be giving. You’ll be able to ask questions directly to our engineers live, but you’re always welcome to pre-boko a one-to-one consultation with them beforehand!

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – Fu Qiao at China Mobile

    Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

    Here, we’re talking to Fu Qiao from China Mobile. She tells the community about how she got started with OpenStack and her favorite memory from the last 10 years of OpenStack.

  • Passing by, Beta Testers needed

    Welcome Everyone, GSoC 2020 is nearly over, during this summer of code. I have been working on creating a new module for Evolution-Data-Server. This is an EteSync sync module that will allow Evolution and EteSync users to add there account to Evolution and handle their data from there.

    In the last post I wrote about that the writing functionality is implemented for Evoluton, for who of you who don’t know Evolution. It is a personal information management application that provides integrated mail, calendaring and address book functionality. As for EteSync, it is a secure, end to-end encrypted and FLOSS sync solution for your contacts, calendars and tasks.

  • GUADEC 2020 and Flatseal 1.6.1

    Two weeks ago, I had the chance to share my experiences Flooding the desktop with learning tools, with the wider GNOME community at GUADEC Even though the event went online for the first time, due to COVID-19, it went pretty smooth!

    The event was full of great talks, including many from former colleagues, Archaeology of Accessibility by @ebassi, Parental controls in GNOME by @pwithnall, What’s new with JavaScript in GNOME by @ptomato, Communication Hacks by @1nuritzi and many, many others.

    The social hours were hilarious and was great to see so many familiar faces. I am really hoping that, whenever we go back to physical events, we can still keep this online experience for those unable to assist.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 106

    In August the YaST Team is focusing on bugfixing, which is a nice way to use the time while many colleagues are on summer vacation. The downside is that blog posts consisting on a list of solved bugs look pretty boring. Fortunatelly, we also found time to implement three nice new features.

  • Build a Raspberry Pi robot buggy with your kids
  • Raspberry Pi-Powered Air Hockey Table Wins Games and Bruises Egos

    The air hockey table was designed by a team. It relies on stepper motors to move the opposing striker (the handle you use to move the puck). The entire operation is controlled by a Raspberry Pi.

  • mozregression and older builds

    Periodically the discussion comes up about pruning away old stored Firefox build artifacts in S3. Each build is tens of megabytes, multiply that by the number of platforms we support and the set of revisions we churn through on a daily basis, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money.

    This came up recently in a discussion about removing the legacy taskcluster deployment — what do we actually lose by cutting back our archive of integration builds? The main reason to keep them around is to facilitate bisection testing with mozregression, to find out when a bug was introduced. Up to now, discussions about this have been a bit hand-wavey: we do keep logs about who’s accessing old builds, but it’s never been clear whether it was mozregression accessing them or something else.

    Happily, now that mozregression has some telemetry, it’s a little easier to get some answers on what people are actually doing. This query gets the distribution of build ages (launched or bisected) over the past 6 months, at a month long granularity.1 Ages are relative to the date mozregression was launched: for example, if someone asked for a build from May 2019 in June 2020, the number would be “13”.

  • Community Member Monday: Pulkit Krishna

    In my country, very few people know that there are other office suites than Microsoft Office. They do not know that there is a suite that’s free and open source software. I am not talking about everyone – but the majority of people.

    By becoming a member, I think I can help to spread the word, that there is a very good free office suite, LibreOffice. Also, almost everybody in my country thinks that to become a part of a software community, you have to be a developer. I want to remove this stereotype. I am not a developer and yet I am a member of TDF.

More in Tux Machines

digiKam 7.7.0 is released

After three months of active maintenance and another bug triage, the digiKam team is proud to present version 7.7.0 of its open source digital photo manager. See below the list of most important features coming with this release. Read more

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world. Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.