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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • /usr/games removed from the default $PATH

    So when you next sit down on a fresh snapshot install and want to do a quick rot13 or do a round of tetris, you may need to specify the full path.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: New News

    I’m going to kick off this post and month by saying that in my defense, I was going to write this post weeks ago, but then I didn’t, and then I got sidetracked, but I had the screenshots open the whole time so it’s not like I forgot, but then I did forget for a little while, and then my session died because the man the myth the legend the as-seen-on-the-web-with-a-different-meaning Adam “ajax” Jackson pranked me with a GLX patch, but I started a new session, and gimp recovered my screenshots, and I remembered I needed to post, and I got distracted even more, and now it’s like three whole weeks later and here we are at the post I was going to write last month but didn’t get around to but now it’s totally been gotten to.

    You’re welcome.

    [...]

    Render passes control how rendering works. There’s load operations which determine how data is retrieved from the framebuffer (I also hate framebuffers) attachments, there’s store operations which determine how data is stored back to the attachments (I hate this part too), and then there’s “dependencies” (better believe I hate these) which manage synchronization between operations, and input attachments (everyone hates these) which enable reading attachment data in shaders, and then also render pass instances have to be started and stopped any time any attachments or framebuffer geometry changes (this sucks), and to top it all off, transfer operations can’t be executed while render passes are active (mega sucks).

    Also there’s nested render passes, but I’m literally fearing for my life even mentioning them where other driver developers can see, so let’s move on.

  • The 5 Top App Definition and Build Tools From CNCF - Container Journal

    Kubernetes has evolved to become the foundation of the modern cloud-native stack. Yet, adopting this lovable beast of a container platform doesn’t come without its hurdles. Thankfully, many toolsets now exist to help engineers package, deploy and manage applications using Kubernetes.

    Below, we’ll look at some graduated and incubating CNCF tools that fit under the application definition and image build category. These open source packages address the operational concerns of Kubernetes, making it easier to install dependencies, generate Kubernetes operators, containerize VMs and more. If you want to improve the developer experience around Kubernetes adoption, these tools are an excellent first place to look.

  • CloudNativeDay: Google Sees Containers Improving App Reliability - Container Journal

    Containers and serverless computing frameworks play a critical role in making environments more resilient as organizations increasingly depend on the availability of applications to drive revenue.

    Steve McGhee, co-author of Enterprise Roadmap to SRE: How to Build and Sustain an SRE Function and a reliability advocate at Google, tells attendees at the virtual CloudNativeDay summit that smaller containers coupled with serverless computing frameworks make it simpler to build modular components that not only isolate dependencies but also make it easier to restore services in the event of a disruption.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Change Comment Color in Vim – Fix Unreadable Blue Color

    Are you annoyed about the comment color in vim? The dark blue color of the comment is often hard to read. In this tutorial, we learn how to change the comment color in Vim. There are few methods we can use to look vim comment very readable.

  • How to Add Repository to Debian

    APT checks the health of all the packages, and dependencies of the package before installing it. APT fetches packages from one or more repositories. A repository (package source) is basically a network server. The term "package" refers to an individual file with a .deb extension that contains either all or part of an application. The normal installation comes with default repositories configured, but these contain only a few packages out of an ocean of free software available. In this tutorial, we learn how to add the package repository to Debian.

  • Making a Video of a Single Window

    I recently wanted to send someone a video of a program doing some interesting things in a single X11 window. Recording the whole desktop is easy (some readers may remember my post on Aeschylus which does just that) but it will include irrelevant (and possibly unwanted) parts of the screen, leading to unnecessarily large files. I couldn't immediately find a tool which did what I wanted on OpenBSD [1] but through a combination of xwininfo, FFmpeg, and hk I was able to put together exactly what I needed in short order. Even better, I was able to easily post-process the video to shrink its file size, speed it up, and contort it to the dimension requirements of various platforms. Here's a video straight out of the little script I put together: [...]

  • Things You Can And Can’t Do

    And it got me thinking about what you can and can’t do — what you do and don’t have control over.

  • allow-new-zones in BIND 9.16 on CentOS 8 Stream under SELinux

    We run these training systems with SELinux enabled (I wouldn’t, but my colleague likes it :-), and that’s the reason I aborted the lab: I couldn’t tell students how to solve the cause other than by disabling SELinux entirely, but there wasn’t enough time for that.

  • Will the IndieWeb Ever Become Mainstream?

    This is an interesting question, thanks for asking it, Jeremy. I do have some history with the IndieWeb, and some opinions, so let’s dive in.

    The short answer to the question is a resounding no, and it all boils down to the fact that the IndieWeb is really complicated to implement, so it will only ever appeal to developers.

  • How to Install CUPS Print Server on Ubuntu 22.04

    If your business has multiple personal computers in the network which need to print, then we need a device called a print server. Print server act intermediate between PC and printers which accept print jobs from PC and send them to respective printers. CUPS is the primary mechanism in the Unix-like operating system for printing and print services. It can allow a computer to act as a Print server. In this tutorial, we learn how to set up CUPS print server on Ubuntu 22.04.

Open Hardware: XON/XOFF and Raspberry Pi Pico

  • From XON/XOFF to Forward Incremental Search

    In the olden days of computing, software flow control with control codes XON and XOFF was a necessary feature that dumb terminals needed to support. When a terminal received more data than it could display, there needed to be a way for the terminal to tell the remote host to pause sending more data. The control code 19 was chosen for this. The control code 17 was chosen to tell the remote host to resume transmission of data.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Used in Plug and Play System Monitor | Tom's Hardware

    Dmytro Panin is at it again, creating a teeny system monitor for his MacBook from scratch with help from our favorite microcontroller, the Raspberry Pi Pico. This plug-and-play system monitor (opens in new tab) lets him keep a close eye on resource usage without having to close any windows or launch any third-party programs. The device is Pico-powered and plugs right into the MacBook to function. It has a display screen that showcases a custom GUI featuring four bar graphs that update in real-time to show the performance of different components, including the CPU, GPU, memory, and SSD usage. It makes it possible to see how hard your PC is running at a glance.

Security Leftovers

How to Apply Accent Colour in Ubuntu Desktop

A step-by-step tutorial on how to apply accent colour in Ubuntu desktop (GNOME) with tips for Kubuntu and others. Read more